4.3.

IRELAND'S GATEWAY

Superport

In response to Brexit the EU proposes a realignment of the North Sea Mediterranean Economic Corridor. We propose Ireland's Gateway Superport as the Northern Terminal Hub of the Corridor.

Ireland's Gateway Superport
Strategic Location Map
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Linking the Superport with the Shannon Navigation
Introduction

An Ireland's Gateway Superport on the Irish Sea has the potential to service many smaller Ports in the Region in both Europe, the UK and beyond. A Superport allows transglobal container ships, sailing mainly from China and the far East, to discharge cargo for regional transmission via smaller vessels. Dublin has capacity for small container vessels only due to inadequate berths and approach channel depth.

 

Finding a suitable site for a Deep-Water Superport off the East Coast of Ireland is challenging due to shallow seas. E Class Container ships have a draft of 16 metres and a length of 400 metres, so a site with sheltered quays and an approach channel of at least 16 metres depth is required.

 

Choice of East Coast sites is severely limited, particularly when multi-modal connectivity is factored in. Carlingford has insufficient channel approach depth and poor connectivity. Arklow has neither suitable inshore depth nor connectivity. Balbriggan has connectivity potential but insufficient inshore depth and is an unprotected site. Belfast Harbour and Dublin Bay have insufficient approach depth. Ref. gpsnauticalcharts.com

 

The Proposed Location of our Concept Deep-Water Container Port, is between the Rogerstown Estuary and Lambay Island in North County Dublin. It is close to the Dublin to Belfast road and rail links, which could be extended to serve the SuperPort. 

The Superport is designed to accommodate Container Ships sailing directly from The Far East etc. It will allow direct links with other deep-water ports such as Zeebrugge without the necessity of trans-shipping goods on to smaller vessels, or through Britain, where custom delays and tariffs threaten. It will replace the existing commercial trade in Dublin Port which, operates at serious cost disadvantage due to shallow depth and other logistical inefficiencies. Cruise vessels will continue to dock in Dublin Port, in a vastly improved environment once commercial shipping and associated unsightly infrastructure are removed.

The Dublin Port Company's Masterplan 2012 - 2040 identifies some of the problems of the existing Port. Its historic location, determines that it can only accommodate  small container ships which are becoming increasingly costly to operate. If Ireland is to trade competitively, it requires an East Coast deep-water, semi-automated, container port capable of accommodating the newer classes of container ship. Note: The Emma Maersk, an E Class container ship is 397 metres long with a draft of 16.02 metres. 

Addition of Sea Locks

Rising Sea levels and extreme weather patterns are beginning to generate a new urgency in the Climate Debate.

Protecting harbours with sea locks is a natural development. They have proved successful for Amsterdam with it's long history of flooding. One of the advantages of Sea Locks is that water levels are stabilized and ships can berth in fresh water on quays that are not subject to tides. Sea Locks have been added to the revised Graphics below on 21.11.2019.

Ireland's Gateway Superport
Sea Lock Concept Layout
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Concept Layout  
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Preliminary Layout Plan
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Alternative Container Port Layout
Lambay Island Sanctuary
Breakwater
We live in a world of increasing negativity                                                           
It is a return to an evolutionary defense mechanism of primitive man                        
Yet we are all aware our world is under critical threat  
We now resort to instant criticism of any proposals for change  however beneficial
Result: Catastrophic decline in our ability to cope with  rapid global change                  
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Breakwaters can avoid contact with Lambay Island 

70% of the world's cargo is carried by container ship. The larger the ship the lower the unit transportation cost

The E-Class Emma Maersk unloading image by gCaptain
Ireland's Gateway Superport
DP World London Gateway - The UK's only equivalent
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Integrating the Superport with the Shannon
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Dublin Orbital Distribution Network
Ireland's Gateway Superport
Relationship with Dublin Port 
© Ross Eccles - Infrastructural Concept Designer, Artist, Architect