GB.8.
Linking Scotland and Ireland
by Tunnel
via the Mull of Kintyre and Fair Head

INTRODUCTION

Access between Scotland and Ireland is currently limited to travel by air or sea.
It has been like this for almost a century since air travel was invented.

Many other countries have tunnel links of substantially greater distance. 
The concept is nothing new. It's just that Britain has fallen behind the rest-of-the-world with it's once world-leading, but now antiquated infrastructure.

Yet the world is changing fast and efficient infrastructure is now a vital component of economic development.

This Concept Proposal graphically illustrates how a new land route involving a tunnel and two bridges can be constructed, linking Scotland and Ireland via the Mull of Kintyre and Antrim route.

The main crossing point for freight and passengers in Northern Ireland is currently the Cairnryan to Larne ferry route. This is susceptible to disruption due to weather conditions.
A quick check of ferry charges reveals that travelling by this route is an expensive process. When competition is introduced, such as Channel Tunnel alternative on the Dover route, charges are significantly lower.


The Concept Graphics below illustrate how this can be achieved.


 
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Linking Scotland & Ireland
Concept Transportation Route
Scotland Ireland Tunnel
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Scotland Ireland Tunnel
Design Considerations
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Scotland Ireland Tunnel
Concept route 
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Scotland Ireland Tunnel
Marine Contours Map

Loch Fyne Bridge  Otter Ferry Location

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Loch Fyne Bridge - Otter Ferry Location
Marine Contours
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Loch Fyne Bridge
Aerial View - Otter Ferry
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Loch Fyne Bridge
View from the C11 road
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Loch Fyne Bridge 
Viewed from Otter Ferry

Loch Fyne Bridge 
Alternative Minard Castle Location

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Loch Fyne Bridge
Minard Castle Location
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Loch Fyne Bridge
Marine Contours Plan
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Loch Fyne Bridge Concept
View from A83 Minard